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"The Fat Man" George Sanger Answers Your Questions About Music and Games

Video game composer George Sanger gave a community interview to Slashdot a little while ago. The whole thing is pretty cool (and long as heck, that man can talk for days), but I enjoyed this bit the most:

How did you get into the video game music business, and what advice would you have for aspiring artists looking to follow in your footsteps?

FAT: A good question—but do bear in mind: Anybody you ask that of has only gotten into the business approximately once.

I thought this was a really keen observation for any “how can I get into the X industry” question.

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GaymerX2 will be the convention's last

Jenna Pitcher, Polygon:

This year’s GaymerX2, the convention that celebrates the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer community in games, will be the last largely due to the growing financial burden, the event’s organizers announced via its official Twitter account.

"We decided that we could no longer continue as a convention as the price of running a yearly convention downtown in San Francisco was just too high — we weren’t able to get the corporate sponsorship that we needed to make it something sustainable, and we were racking up huge amounts of debt to put this years con on," organizer Matt Conn told Polygon.

Pretty unfortunate. San Francisco is a hell of an expensive place.

I’m rather sad at the part where they weren’t able to get enough corporate sponsors interested in the convention.

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A goat farmer reviews Goat Simulator: "Goats love champagne."

As part of our continuing coverage of the 2014 Citizen Kane Comparison Fodder of the Year, Goat Simulator, here’s a review of the game by actual real life goat farmer Angelina Bellebuono:

The pasture goats do not seek to escape their fenced pasture confines, but they are insatiably curious. I honor that curiosity now by exploring with this Caprine Destructor. My keystroke skills are weak, but we master headbutting quickly. We practice on cars, exploding them from painted red into charred metal shells. We practice on barrels in a rhythm—headbutt, back up, go again. Headbutt, back up, go again.

I feel a little dirty for having so much fun. “Don’t tell,” I whisper to Goat, my enabler.

Bellebuono is a bit taken aback by the warm reception her essay’s been getting.

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In Focus:

This year marks four decades since the Cyprus National Guard staged a coup that led to Turkish military intervention and escalated the civil war between the Greek and Turkish communities on the island. After the ceasefire, a heavily restricted buffer zone, controlled by the United Nations, was established between the north and south. It stretches 180 km (112 mi) across the whole island measuring 7.4 km (4.6 mi) at its widest and 3.3 m (11 ft) at its narrowest point. The demilitarized zone is restricted to the general public and no Greek or Turkish Cypriots are allowed inside. Reuters photographer Neil Hall recently visited the buffer zone, which still contains crumbling relics of times gone by - abandoned houses, businesses, and even an airport - crumbling snapshots of Cyprus in 1974.

The gallery has 28 photos, including this one of some billboards at the airport.

In Focus:

This year marks four decades since the Cyprus National Guard staged a coup that led to Turkish military intervention and escalated the civil war between the Greek and Turkish communities on the island. After the ceasefire, a heavily restricted buffer zone, controlled by the United Nations, was established between the north and south. It stretches 180 km (112 mi) across the whole island measuring 7.4 km (4.6 mi) at its widest and 3.3 m (11 ft) at its narrowest point. The demilitarized zone is restricted to the general public and no Greek or Turkish Cypriots are allowed inside. Reuters photographer Neil Hall recently visited the buffer zone, which still contains crumbling relics of times gone by - abandoned houses, businesses, and even an airport - crumbling snapshots of Cyprus in 1974.

The gallery has 28 photos, including this one of some billboards at the airport.

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Alberta dentist plans to clone John Lennon using $33,000 tooth that once belonged to famous Beatle

Sarah Boesveld, the National Post:

An Alberta dentist has gained international attention for his far-out plans to clone a baby from one of John Lennon’s teeth and raise the test-tube Beatle as his son.

Dr. Michael Zuk, from Red Deer, paid $33,000 for the musician’s molar when the family of Mr. Lennon’s former housekeeper, who had lived in Canada, put it up for auction nearly three years ago.

What.

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How the Civil Rights Act pioneered anti-discrimination laws in America

On July 2, 1964, President Lyndon Johnson signed into law the Civil Rights Act. In honor of the fiftieth anniversary, the LBJ Presidential Library in Texas has been holding a summit, with speeches by four Presidents and so on.

At the summit, Gwen Ifull of PBS NewsHour spoke with four folks on the topic of what the Act did and meant and represented:

SHIRLEY FRANKLIN, Former Mayor, Atlanta: Over the years, we have seen the explosion of political figures from all walks of life. And so it opened the door for people from all backgrounds, whether gay, lesbian, people from limited means.

There was a sense when I was growing up that you had to be from a certain side of the tracks in order to be an elected official. You had to be lucky to be an elected official. And with the passage of the Civil Rights Acts and the Voting Rights Act and all that that entailed, all of a sudden, a child like me could not be mayor of Atlanta when I was born, when I graduated from high school, when I graduated from college.

But, some years later, I had the opportunity because of the legislative initiatives, but also because of the shift in the cultural forms and the cultural traditions.

But we’ve still got a long way to go.

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The less Americans know about Ukraine’s location, the more they want U.S. to intervene

Political scientists Kyle Dropp, Joshua D. Kertzer, and Thomas Zeitzoff writing for The Washington Post:

On March 28-31, 2014, we asked a national sample of 2,066 Americans (fielded via Survey Sampling International Inc. (SSI), what action they wanted the U.S. to take in Ukraine, but with a twist: In addition to measuring standard demographic characteristics and general foreign policy attitudes, we also asked our survey respondents to locate Ukraine on a map as part of a larger, ongoing project to study foreign policy knowledge. We wanted to see where Americans think Ukraine is and to learn if this knowledge (or lack thereof) is related to their foreign policy views. We found that only one out of six Americans can find Ukraine on a map, and that this lack of knowledge is related to preferences: The farther their guesses were from Ukraine’s actual location, the more they wanted the U.S. to intervene with military force.

I wonder how many polls are conducted just to call people dumb. It’s probably a lot.