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Posts tagged 1970s

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World Champion's First Filibuster (1972)

AP report published in the June 29, 1972, issue of The Victoria Advocate:

[Sen. Mike] McKool, was still surprisingly alert and his voice strong, after holding the Senate floor for 42 hours and 33 minutes, most of it spent walking and talking.

McKool gained the floor Monday to speak for his proposed amendment that would add $17 million to the spending bill to be given to state mental health and mental retardation institutions. When he sat down the amendment was defeated easily, getting only six backers out of the 31-member Senate.

A forty-two and a half filibuster in support of mental health funding sounds okay to me. This was reported as a record in the 1974 Guinness Book of World Records.

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"I wrote the Anarchist Cookbook in 1969. Now I see its premise as flawed"

William Powell, author of The Anarchist Cookbook, has since writing the book come to disavow it and request that it no longer be published. He wrote a piece for The Guardian explaining his new position:

Over the years, I have come to understand that the basic premise behind the Cookbook is profoundly flawed. The anger that motivated the writing of the Cookbook blinded me to the illogical notion that violence can be used to prevent violence. I had fallen for the same irrational pattern of thought that led to US military involvement in both Vietnam and Iraq. The irony is not lost on me.

To paraphrase Aristotle: it is easy to be angry. But to be angry with the right person, at the right time and to the right degree that is hard – that is the hallmark of a civilized person.

Pretty strong statement.

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New Nixon Tapes Reveal Details of Meeting With Anti-War Activists

Absolutely crazy story + interview by Ray Suarez for PBS Newshour on a jaunt out of the White House by President Nixon in the middle of the night to meet with anti-Vietnam war protestors. Here’s Melvin Small of Wayne State University:

It’s a little odd, because Nixon had been on the phone. He had made 50 phone calls from about 9:00 until 3:30. He called Henry Kissinger eight times. He was in a very odd situation mentally, I think. The country was falling apart, from his perspective. He later said this was the darkest period of his presidency.

Henry Kissinger said Washington and the White House was besieged. There were district buses lined up around the White House for who knows what. The 82nd Airborne was in the basement of the Executive Office Building across the street. This was a very tense and, in many ways, from his professional, dangerous period.

And, then, all of a sudden, he says, let’s go look at the Lincoln Memorial.