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Posts tagged Modern Mechanix

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Modern Mechanix: Albert Einstein - 1987–1955

Physicist Isidor Isaac Rabi eulogizing Albert Einstein in the June 1955 issue of Scientific American:

Einstein was a unique personality. He was not attracted by fame or fortune nor swayed by the opinions of the majority. He knew his talent and guarded it jealously against outside interference. Although fearless in support of any cause he considered worthy, he gave only so much of himself and no more. Physics was his life, and he lived it according to his own lights, with complete objectivity and integrity.

Niels Bohr also wrote a tribute for the same piece.

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Modern Mechanix: Grandmother of Pedro the Voder

The latest thing on Modern Mechanix that’s creeping me out is this article from the May 1939 issue of Popular Science:

For forty years this Austrian experimenter labored to create a machine that could talk. His nearest approach to it, by 1870, was the remarkable contrivance above. When he worked a foot-powered bellows and various controls, the rubber lips of the mask uttered something faintly resembling syllables.

The article includes a drawing of the device, a loom-like contraption with a woman’s face on the side. I haven’t slept since I saw it.

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Modern Mechanix: "SEX in Advertising"

Modern Mechanix is usually good for a lark. This week’s recommendation comes from the march 1964 issue of Sexology.

On the plus side, it makes me feel good that this was being acknowledged and discussed as early as the 1960s.

However:

"Today," said Justice J. Erwin Shapiro in what may be a historic censorship case, "skirts are shorter and the outlined erogenous areas of women are taken matter-of-factly. The under-garment model has dropped the mask from her eyes and looks at you slyly as she displays the advantages of any-brand’s lira and girdle in advertisements published in ladies’ magazines and our most respected newspapers and in telecasts coming into the home… .”

(emph. added) WHY IS THIS SO CREEPY

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Modern Mechanix: Mars Refuses to Answer Radio Messages

Modern Mechanix time, this time from the May 1929 issue of Modern Mechanics:

The latest evidence of the unsocial nature of the Martians came recently when Dr. H. Mansfield Robinson, shown in the picture at the left, attempted to send a message to a woman on Mars who, he reported, had been in communication with him. Although listeners all over the world were on the alert for her response, it failed to come through.

Martians: kind of dicks.

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Modern Mechanix: How to Grow a Beard

J. Robert Connor in the October 1956 issue of Mechanix Illustrated on the benefits of growing a beard:

But beard growing isn’t all agony. The number of women who affect distaste for the beard is more than compensated for by those who go for it as cats go for catnip. Two out of five women are unable to contain their enthusiasm. They stare at a beard in joyous fascination; if allowed to they will stroke it as the minutes fly by.

A prominent example of the modern beard-loving woman is Jet MacDonald, wife of William Johnson who appears in the Broadway musical Pipe Dream.” Johnson sports a growth about which Jet says, “It’s soft and warm, like kissing a precious little cocker spaniel.”

Two out of five women: it’s real science!

Also gold from Connor’s piece are his travails in growing a beard (“On the road unknown motorists will pull up alongside your car and give you a savage glare.”), sketches of people with facial hair in the shape of letters from the English alphabet, and manipulated photos of former President Harry Truman with various styles of facial hair. A must-read.

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YOU CAN Make Your Own 4th of July Fireworks (Jul. 1930 issue of Modern Mechanics)
THIS month’s chemical section is dedicated to that noble and glorious purpose of celebrating the Fourth of July in noisy fashion—and with cannon crackers and colored fire that can safely be made in your own lab. However, before plunging into a pile of recipes and formulas it is necessary to warn you fellows to be extremely careful in preparing these mixtures. In themselves they will not blow up until brought into actual contact with fire or through extreme friction, but remember always that you are working with explosives—regardless of how mild they may be away from fire.
To overcome the dangers of friction it is well to mix your powders in small doses. A simple way is to put them on a sheet of fairly substantial paper and, by picking up two ends, rolling the powder back and forth as you raise and lower your hands alternately. But where you must use your pestle and mortar—watch out for friction!
…
And now, here are the formulas. But remember, all the ingredients must be dry and powdered separately and then mixed on a sheet of paper, without friction. Always bear in mind that sulphur and chlorate of potassium will “go boom” when rubbed together. Keep the ingredients away from open flames.
A nice bright red fire can be made by using 20 parts of strontium nitrate finely powdered, six parts of sulphur, 5 parts of saltpetre and one part of lampblack. Your druggist can supply them all in powdered form. They may cost a few cents more that way, but it is safer than trying to powder them yourself.

And so on.
The 1930s were a dangerous time.
(Via Modern Mechanix)

YOU CAN Make Your Own 4th of July Fireworks (Jul. 1930 issue of Modern Mechanics)

THIS month’s chemical section is dedicated to that noble and glorious purpose of celebrating the Fourth of July in noisy fashion—and with cannon crackers and colored fire that can safely be made in your own lab. However, before plunging into a pile of recipes and formulas it is necessary to warn you fellows to be extremely careful in preparing these mixtures. In themselves they will not blow up until brought into actual contact with fire or through extreme friction, but remember always that you are working with explosives—regardless of how mild they may be away from fire.

To overcome the dangers of friction it is well to mix your powders in small doses. A simple way is to put them on a sheet of fairly substantial paper and, by picking up two ends, rolling the powder back and forth as you raise and lower your hands alternately. But where you must use your pestle and mortar—watch out for friction!

And now, here are the formulas. But remember, all the ingredients must be dry and powdered separately and then mixed on a sheet of paper, without friction. Always bear in mind that sulphur and chlorate of potassium will “go boom” when rubbed together. Keep the ingredients away from open flames.

A nice bright red fire can be made by using 20 parts of strontium nitrate finely powdered, six parts of sulphur, 5 parts of saltpetre and one part of lampblack. Your druggist can supply them all in powdered form. They may cost a few cents more that way, but it is safer than trying to powder them yourself.

And so on.

The 1930s were a dangerous time.

(Via Modern Mechanix)

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Electric “Bombardment” Treatment Cures Black Eye (Dec. 1936 issue of Modern Mechanix)
A DISFIGURING, and sometimes embarrassing black eye can be removed in less than one hour by the use of a new static machine that “bombards” the eye with electricity. The electric treatment is painless.

The 1930s were a dangerous time.
(Via Modern Mechanix)

Electric “Bombardment” Treatment Cures Black Eye (Dec. 1936 issue of Modern Mechanix)

A DISFIGURING, and sometimes embarrassing black eye can be removed in less than one hour by the use of a new static machine that “bombards” the eye with electricity. The electric treatment is painless.

The 1930s were a dangerous time.

(Via Modern Mechanix)

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Sugar Violin Plays Music

Sugar Violin Plays Music

CONSTRUCTED entirely of sugar by Adolph Hubner, a San Francisco confectioner and sculptor, the novel violin shown above produces excellent music. The instrument was first modeled in cardboard, and finally modeled in sugar with gum tragacanth. A number of famous- violinists have pronounced the instrument excellent in tone.

Modern Mechanix posted this blurb from the April 1931 issue of Modern Mechanics and Inventions today. Would sugar even have the tensile strength to hold the strings taut enough?

'Ili: How would that even work?

Colin: Sweetly.

'Ili: Now why did you have to go and do that.

Colin: Too saccharine for you?

'Ili: blocked