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Pablo Picasso's The Blue Room reveals hidden portrait of mystery man

The Telegraph:

Scientists and art experts have found a hidden painting beneath one of Pablo Picasso’s first masterpieces, “The Blue Room,” using advances in infrared imagery to reveal a bow-tied man with his face resting on his hand.

Conservators long suspected there might be something under the surface of “The Blue Room,” which has been part of The Phillips Collection in Washington since 1927.

Brushstrokes on the piece clearly do not match the composition that depicts a woman bathing in Picasso’s studio. A conservator noted the odd brushstrokes in a 1954 letter, but it was not until the 1990s that an x-ray of the painting first revealed a fuzzy image of something under the picture. It was not clear, though, that it was a portrait.

Neato. We’re making this kind of discovery all the time these days.

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European Space Agency/NASA image:

Hubble uses a Fine Guidance System (FGS) in order to maintain stability whilst performing observations. A set of gyroscopes measures the attitude of the telescope, which is then corrected by a set of reaction wheels. In order to compensate for gyroscopic drift, the FGS locks onto a fixed point in space, which is referred to as a guide star.
It is suspected that in this case, Hubble had locked onto a bad guide star, potentially a double star or binary. This caused an error in the tracking system, resulting in this remarkable picture of brightly coloured stellar streaks. The prominent red streaks are from stars in the globular cluster NGC 288.

This is the truest of art. Art simply does not get any artier than this.

European Space Agency/NASA image:

Hubble uses a Fine Guidance System (FGS) in order to maintain stability whilst performing observations. A set of gyroscopes measures the attitude of the telescope, which is then corrected by a set of reaction wheels. In order to compensate for gyroscopic drift, the FGS locks onto a fixed point in space, which is referred to as a guide star.

It is suspected that in this case, Hubble had locked onto a bad guide star, potentially a double star or binary. This caused an error in the tracking system, resulting in this remarkable picture of brightly coloured stellar streaks. The prominent red streaks are from stars in the globular cluster NGC 288.

This is the truest of art. Art simply does not get any artier than this.

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70sscifiart:

Bob Eggleton - Astrodragon

DRAGONS WITH JETPACKS
I REPEAT, LADIES AND GENTLEMEN
WE HAVE DRAGONS WITH JETPACKS
Some background info on this one from The Trading Card Database:

The T-Shirt art to the 1995 Dragoncon NASfiC T-Shirt to promote the two worlds of Science Fiction & Fantasy coming together. This creature’s “look” was inspired in part by Japanese monsters.

Incidentally, how were science fiction art trading cards ever a thing? And why aren’t they still a thing?

70sscifiart:

Bob Eggleton - Astrodragon

DRAGONS WITH JETPACKS

I REPEAT, LADIES AND GENTLEMEN

WE HAVE DRAGONS WITH JETPACKS

Some background info on this one from The Trading Card Database:

The T-Shirt art to the 1995 Dragoncon NASfiC T-Shirt to promote the two worlds of Science Fiction & Fantasy coming together. This creature’s “look” was inspired in part by Japanese monsters.

Incidentally, how were science fiction art trading cards ever a thing? And why aren’t they still a thing?

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Tower To Rise At MoMA PS1, With Self-Assembling Bricks

Shaunacy Ferro on Co.Design:

MoMA PS1 has selected the winner of its annual Young Architects Program, a temporary outdoor installation that will open in late June. Hy-Fi, the winning project from David Benjamin of The Living, features self-assembling bricks made of organic material, and will be nearly carbon neutral in its construction.

Benjamin’s bio-design concept will consist of two kinds of brick: some made out of live organic material, and some reflective bricks. For the organic bricks, chopped up corn husks are recycled to combine with mycelium, a kind of mushroom root material. The mixture is then packed into a mold. The reflective bricks, placed at the top of the tubular structure, bounce light off a daylight mirror film coating onto the organic material below, helping them self-assemble into a brick shape and solidify.

The post also includes a video on the project produced by Brooklyn Digital Foundry, but it doesn’t really have any info that’s not in the post. It has some cool renders though.

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70sscifiart:

John Harris

Colin’s and my new favorite internet joint is 70s sci-fi art, a frequently updated Tumblr of neato science fiction-y art type stuff. I’m currently trawling my way through the archives from the beginning and there are over 200 pages so this is going to take absolutely forever to get through.
This piece is “Fremde Zivilisation” (“alien civilization”), a work by Michael Böhme in his Spaceart collection.

70sscifiart:

John Harris

Colin’s and my new favorite internet joint is 70s sci-fi art, a frequently updated Tumblr of neato science fiction-y art type stuff. I’m currently trawling my way through the archives from the beginning and there are over 200 pages so this is going to take absolutely forever to get through.

This piece is “Fremde Zivilisation” (“alien civilization”), a work by Michael Böhme in his Spaceart collection.

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Crossrail Will Transform London

Architecture critic Rowan Moore writing in The Guardian:

Sometimes, when flying over a landscape, you see a seam of unexpected fecundity – lush trees, richer green – that indicates the presence of water or a change to a more fertile soil. Something similar is happening across London. If property values could be made visible (and often they are, by increases in new construction), you would already see a long strip of intensification, in a city that already is hardly a desert, running from east to west. Over the next few years, it will become more and more apparent.

This is the effect of the underground Nile called Crossrail and it will show what happens when £14.8bn of public money is streamed underground in order to irrigate a city and its development opportunities above. Its current signs include diversions, closed roads, trucks of dirt scaring cyclists, references in estate agents’ particulars, fluorescent-suited workers, hoardings that give no clue to the chasms behind them, informative graphics and the saturated light that shines in computer-generated images of future buildings. Also such things as a once-ramshackle city farm in Stepney, east London, now spruce and confident, various redecorated community centres and support for a literary festival in Islington. This is due to a programme which obliges Crossrail’s contractors to make donations to the communities in which they are working.

This is incredibly cool. I can’t imagine something like this happening where I live.