Nullary Sources

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Posts tagged art

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70sscifiart:

Bob Eggleton - Astrodragon

DRAGONS WITH JETPACKS
I REPEAT, LADIES AND GENTLEMEN
WE HAVE DRAGONS WITH JETPACKS
Some background info on this one from The Trading Card Database:

The T-Shirt art to the 1995 Dragoncon NASfiC T-Shirt to promote the two worlds of Science Fiction & Fantasy coming together. This creature’s “look” was inspired in part by Japanese monsters.

Incidentally, how were science fiction art trading cards ever a thing? And why aren’t they still a thing?

70sscifiart:

Bob Eggleton - Astrodragon

DRAGONS WITH JETPACKS

I REPEAT, LADIES AND GENTLEMEN

WE HAVE DRAGONS WITH JETPACKS

Some background info on this one from The Trading Card Database:

The T-Shirt art to the 1995 Dragoncon NASfiC T-Shirt to promote the two worlds of Science Fiction & Fantasy coming together. This creature’s “look” was inspired in part by Japanese monsters.

Incidentally, how were science fiction art trading cards ever a thing? And why aren’t they still a thing?

0 notes

Tower To Rise At MoMA PS1, With Self-Assembling Bricks

Shaunacy Ferro on Co.Design:

MoMA PS1 has selected the winner of its annual Young Architects Program, a temporary outdoor installation that will open in late June. Hy-Fi, the winning project from David Benjamin of The Living, features self-assembling bricks made of organic material, and will be nearly carbon neutral in its construction.

Benjamin’s bio-design concept will consist of two kinds of brick: some made out of live organic material, and some reflective bricks. For the organic bricks, chopped up corn husks are recycled to combine with mycelium, a kind of mushroom root material. The mixture is then packed into a mold. The reflective bricks, placed at the top of the tubular structure, bounce light off a daylight mirror film coating onto the organic material below, helping them self-assemble into a brick shape and solidify.

The post also includes a video on the project produced by Brooklyn Digital Foundry, but it doesn’t really have any info that’s not in the post. It has some cool renders though.

164 notes

70sscifiart:

John Harris

Colin’s and my new favorite internet joint is 70s sci-fi art, a frequently updated Tumblr of neato science fiction-y art type stuff. I’m currently trawling my way through the archives from the beginning and there are over 200 pages so this is going to take absolutely forever to get through.
This piece is “Fremde Zivilisation” (“alien civilization”), a work by Michael Böhme in his Spaceart collection.

70sscifiart:

John Harris

Colin’s and my new favorite internet joint is 70s sci-fi art, a frequently updated Tumblr of neato science fiction-y art type stuff. I’m currently trawling my way through the archives from the beginning and there are over 200 pages so this is going to take absolutely forever to get through.

This piece is “Fremde Zivilisation” (“alien civilization”), a work by Michael Böhme in his Spaceart collection.

0 notes

Crossrail Will Transform London

Architecture critic Rowan Moore writing in The Guardian:

Sometimes, when flying over a landscape, you see a seam of unexpected fecundity – lush trees, richer green – that indicates the presence of water or a change to a more fertile soil. Something similar is happening across London. If property values could be made visible (and often they are, by increases in new construction), you would already see a long strip of intensification, in a city that already is hardly a desert, running from east to west. Over the next few years, it will become more and more apparent.

This is the effect of the underground Nile called Crossrail and it will show what happens when £14.8bn of public money is streamed underground in order to irrigate a city and its development opportunities above. Its current signs include diversions, closed roads, trucks of dirt scaring cyclists, references in estate agents’ particulars, fluorescent-suited workers, hoardings that give no clue to the chasms behind them, informative graphics and the saturated light that shines in computer-generated images of future buildings. Also such things as a once-ramshackle city farm in Stepney, east London, now spruce and confident, various redecorated community centres and support for a literary festival in Islington. This is due to a programme which obliges Crossrail’s contractors to make donations to the communities in which they are working.

This is incredibly cool. I can’t imagine something like this happening where I live.

0 notes

In a moment of tremendous egotism here on Nullary Sources, here’s a really neat still from Philippe Parreno’s 2011 film/art landscape C.H.Z, for which I’ll be receiving a check for naming royalties any day now.
For real though, this is a cool project and I’d love to check out either the film or the book. Alexander Forbes wrote up the film for BLOUIN ARTINFO:

Philippe Parreno’s “Continuously Habitable Zones” are hardly habitable, at least not for now. The 14-minute film premiered at Berlin’s CineStar theater in conjunction with the Diamler Art Collection’s exhibition celebrating the automobile’s 125th anniversary, with the support of Esther Schipper, Pilar Corrias, Paolo and Rosario Pimenta. A series of six investigations of a monochromic black landscape, the work is like a sculpturally rendered Ad Reinhardt painting: burned and barren, save some still blacker vegetation and uprooted trees.
Parreno partnered with landscape architect Bas Smets to create the otherworldly panorama — the title refers to planets, which lie within a range of distances from their respective suns that would theoretically allow them to support life.

Hat tip to Sofi for bringing this one to my easily stoked attention.

In a moment of tremendous egotism here on Nullary Sources, here’s a really neat still from Philippe Parreno’s 2011 film/art landscape C.H.Z, for which I’ll be receiving a check for naming royalties any day now.

For real though, this is a cool project and I’d love to check out either the film or the book. Alexander Forbes wrote up the film for BLOUIN ARTINFO:

Philippe Parreno’s “Continuously Habitable Zones” are hardly habitable, at least not for now. The 14-minute film premiered at Berlin’s CineStar theater in conjunction with the Diamler Art Collection’s exhibition celebrating the automobile’s 125th anniversary, with the support of Esther Schipper, Pilar Corrias, Paolo and Rosario Pimenta. A series of six investigations of a monochromic black landscape, the work is like a sculpturally rendered Ad Reinhardt painting: burned and barren, save some still blacker vegetation and uprooted trees.

Parreno partnered with landscape architect Bas Smets to create the otherworldly panorama — the title refers to planets, which lie within a range of distances from their respective suns that would theoretically allow them to support life.

Hat tip to Sofi for bringing this one to my easily stoked attention.

1 note

THE TERRIBLE MACHINE is an audiovisual gameish construct by Synesthete (Todd Thille) and Robotkid (Josh Randall):

Terrible Machine is a two player VJ game experience realized in collaboration with robotkid. A VCR theme informs the design, with custom controllers being mounted onto VHS boxes. An Arduino UNO processes input from arcade style buttons. An intermediate program, built with openFrameworks, intercepts serial messages and turns them into OSC. Finally, Resolume Avenue receives the OSC and triggers playback of clips and compositions, allowing the players to mix on top of a backing audio visual loop.

 I kind of want to try this thing out, like, right now.

0 notes

Chasing the White House Cezannes

Christopher Knight, art critic for the Los Angeles Times:

Eighty-five years ago, Charles A. Loeser, an American living abroad, gave the White House eight Cézanne paintings, a bequest that would have been the envy of any museum in the world.

The tale of the paintings is a tangled one, and some puzzle pieces are still missing.

But this much, at least, is known: John Walker III, chief curator of the National Gallery of Art, surreptitiously diverted the Cézannes from the White House to boost his fledgling museum’s collections. To get them, he later admitted, he bamboozled Loeser’s daughter and President Truman.

This is a really bizarre and fascinating story.

7 notes

Anime News Network news translation:

Artist and painter Hiroo Isono, who worked on the Mana (Seiken Densetsu) series of video games, passed away on May 28 due to heart failure. Isono was born in 1945. A memorial service was held on May 31.

Isono drew the iconic Mana Tree art for the SNES game Secret of Mana, which is probably his best known work overseas.
I’m not very familiar with his works, but as far as I can tell, his Mana series illustrations were his only art for games/films/etc., and most of his art was for galleries, art books, and so on. The piece accompanying this post came from an online collection of his works at a licensing agency that my e-pal surasshu found. I don’t have the slightest idea what work of Isono’s it comes from, but I found it quite beautiful and inspiring all the same.
R.I.P.

Anime News Network news translation:

Artist and painter Hiroo Isono, who worked on the Mana (Seiken Densetsu) series of video games, passed away on May 28 due to heart failure. Isono was born in 1945. A memorial service was held on May 31.

Isono drew the iconic Mana Tree art for the SNES game Secret of Mana, which is probably his best known work overseas.

I’m not very familiar with his works, but as far as I can tell, his Mana series illustrations were his only art for games/films/etc., and most of his art was for galleries, art books, and so on. The piece accompanying this post came from an online collection of his works at a licensing agency that my e-pal surasshu found. I don’t have the slightest idea what work of Isono’s it comes from, but I found it quite beautiful and inspiring all the same.

R.I.P.