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Posts tagged film

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George Gene Gustines on The New York Times's ArtsBeat blog:

In putting together “Stripped,” a documentary exploring the art and evolution of newspaper comic strips, Dave Kellett and Fred Schroeder, the co-directors, interviewed more than 70 cartoonists. One of the biggest gets was Bill Watterson, the reclusive creator of “Calvin and Hobbes,” the beloved newspaper strip about a mischievous boy and his stuffed tiger, which ran from 1985 to 1995.

Watterson even drew them some poster art, which is pretty neato.

George Gene Gustines on The New York Times's ArtsBeat blog:

In putting together “Stripped,” a documentary exploring the art and evolution of newspaper comic strips, Dave Kellett and Fred Schroeder, the co-directors, interviewed more than 70 cartoonists. One of the biggest gets was Bill Watterson, the reclusive creator of “Calvin and Hobbes,” the beloved newspaper strip about a mischievous boy and his stuffed tiger, which ran from 1985 to 1995.

Watterson even drew them some poster art, which is pretty neato.

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(Video content warning: blood and violence)

One of Colin’s and my favorite films of 2012 was The Raid: Redemption. Somehow I failed to notice that a trailer for the sequel, The Raid 2: Berandal, has been around since last year. Looks like it’s going to be intense.

I love the way this trailer is structured, by the way. Builds up to something fierce, yet doesn’t really give away any part of the plot.

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📣 ATTENTION EVERYONE ANIMATION BACKGROUNDS IS BACK 📣
For those who have never heard of it, Animation Backgrounds was a blog run by Rob Richards, who spliced together the background art from old cartoons (especially Disney and Warner Bros. stuff). In September 2010, he went on hiatus to deal with some major personal issues, and after more than three years it seemed like it would be permanent. But last month he posted asking if anyone would be interested in him continuing, and a month later he’s returned!
His first new post features art from the Disney film Peter Pan. He’s got five pieces of art, including the one I’ve attached to this post, and if you haven’t clicked the link in the last sentence you should hurry up and so do already.
Richards sounds like his life’s in a lot better place than it was a few years ago, so that’s also excellent news.

📣 ATTENTION EVERYONE ANIMATION BACKGROUNDS IS BACK 📣

For those who have never heard of it, Animation Backgrounds was a blog run by Rob Richards, who spliced together the background art from old cartoons (especially Disney and Warner Bros. stuff). In September 2010, he went on hiatus to deal with some major personal issues, and after more than three years it seemed like it would be permanent. But last month he posted asking if anyone would be interested in him continuing, and a month later he’s returned!

His first new post features art from the Disney film Peter Pan. He’s got five pieces of art, including the one I’ve attached to this post, and if you haven’t clicked the link in the last sentence you should hurry up and so do already.

Richards sounds like his life’s in a lot better place than it was a few years ago, so that’s also excellent news.

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The A.V. Club: Tamra Davis interview

2010 A.V. Club interview with director Tamra Davis, where she provides yet another excellent reason to hate the film Billy Madison:

AVC: Do you have a memorable Adam Sandler story?

TD: I don’t know. I just saw Adam recently. When we did Billy Madison, we were in Canada and staying in the same hotel. We had to bond immediately to make that film. We would spend hours talking on the phone about what we were going to do the next day. The day we were going to do the dodgeball scene, I had it all worked out with stunts and balls and kids, etcetera. The night before, Adam calls me on the phone and says, “Tamra, you know, tomorrow we’re going to do this dodgeball scene. I really want to hit these kids.” I’m like, “Adam, you can’t just hit these kids. They’re children.” He said, “No, no, no. Line them up, and ask who would be okay getting hit. Make sure you get the parents to say yes, and I’m really going to hit them hard.” I was like, “You’re crazy.” And he’s like, “No, hurting kids is funny. It’s going to be really funny.” I was like, “Adam!” And that’s what he did—he really hit those kids as hard as he could. And I cut right before you see the kids just fully start crying.

Okay, look, I get it. It’s funny because children are terrible, said the guy on the internet.

But if your immediate reaction to this wasn’t revulsion but rather “haha they took kids who were excited to be in a movie, threw things at them until they cried, and then filmed them,” then you should probably re-evaluate your life up to this point.

And if, like some of the commenters, your reaction was that it would be even funnier if they included the children crying, then you’re probably not even a real human being, just a Cylon in a skin suit.

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Alfred Hitchcock's unseen Holocaust documentary to be screened

Geoffrey Macnab, The Independent:

The British Army Film Unit cameramen who shot the liberation of Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in 1945 used to joke about the reaction of Alfred Hitchcock to the horrific footage they filmed. When Hitchcock first saw the footage, the legendary British director was reportedly so traumatised that he stayed away from Pinewood Studios for a week. Hitchcock may have been the king of horror movies but he was utterly appalled by “the real thing”.

The rest of the article is about Memory of the Camps, a documentary Hitchcock helped with on the same subject that’s been rediscovered and is being restored.

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"Level Up" is Stacy Eduarte’s second-year film in the UCLA Animation Workshop:

I wanted to have a bit of silly fun this school year and make a little parody on older videogames I grew up with. Coincidentally, some time later that fall after I started working on the storyboard, Disney released information about their upcoming film “Wreck-It Ralph”.

I don’t have any commentary on this beyond that pixels are neato.

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‘Doctor Who’ screening stuns at Monday box office, No. 2 after ‘Catching Fire’

Will people go to movie theaters? Yes. Will they go to movie theaters staffed by pimply-faced teens slinging popcorn to see what will be on Netflix in a couple months? Increasingly, looks like no. Should theaters start moving away from a commodity experience to a luxury experience? In my view, yes. Is this a panacea? No, of course not. Will it be challenging in the same way that introducing any new, original offering is? Duh. Will anyone in Hollywood listen to me? We’ll see.

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In a moment of tremendous egotism here on Nullary Sources, here’s a really neat still from Philippe Parreno’s 2011 film/art landscape C.H.Z, for which I’ll be receiving a check for naming royalties any day now.
For real though, this is a cool project and I’d love to check out either the film or the book. Alexander Forbes wrote up the film for BLOUIN ARTINFO:

Philippe Parreno’s “Continuously Habitable Zones” are hardly habitable, at least not for now. The 14-minute film premiered at Berlin’s CineStar theater in conjunction with the Diamler Art Collection’s exhibition celebrating the automobile’s 125th anniversary, with the support of Esther Schipper, Pilar Corrias, Paolo and Rosario Pimenta. A series of six investigations of a monochromic black landscape, the work is like a sculpturally rendered Ad Reinhardt painting: burned and barren, save some still blacker vegetation and uprooted trees.
Parreno partnered with landscape architect Bas Smets to create the otherworldly panorama — the title refers to planets, which lie within a range of distances from their respective suns that would theoretically allow them to support life.

Hat tip to Sofi for bringing this one to my easily stoked attention.

In a moment of tremendous egotism here on Nullary Sources, here’s a really neat still from Philippe Parreno’s 2011 film/art landscape C.H.Z, for which I’ll be receiving a check for naming royalties any day now.

For real though, this is a cool project and I’d love to check out either the film or the book. Alexander Forbes wrote up the film for BLOUIN ARTINFO:

Philippe Parreno’s “Continuously Habitable Zones” are hardly habitable, at least not for now. The 14-minute film premiered at Berlin’s CineStar theater in conjunction with the Diamler Art Collection’s exhibition celebrating the automobile’s 125th anniversary, with the support of Esther Schipper, Pilar Corrias, Paolo and Rosario Pimenta. A series of six investigations of a monochromic black landscape, the work is like a sculpturally rendered Ad Reinhardt painting: burned and barren, save some still blacker vegetation and uprooted trees.

Parreno partnered with landscape architect Bas Smets to create the otherworldly panorama — the title refers to planets, which lie within a range of distances from their respective suns that would theoretically allow them to support life.

Hat tip to Sofi for bringing this one to my easily stoked attention.

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Here’s the first part of a making-of documentary on the 1993 film adapation of Super Mario Bros. Part 2 is here (unfortunately blocked in the U.S.) and part 3 is here.

Check out the astoundingly inappropriate background music accompanying the description of the film starting at 1:15. I need to find a way to make that the soundtrack to my entire life.

Also check out Bob Hoskins’s amazing description of his career at 1:50. Also how, at the very end, more than a minute of the documentary is spent just showing a Bob Hoskins dance scene in full. It’s all pretty incredible.