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Posts tagged film

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As part of his Every Frame a Painting show, Tony Zhou has analyzed Michael Bay’s filmmaking style in “Michael Bay - What is Bayhem?”

Yes, this is really happening.

No, it’s not a fluff piece. And it’s actually fascinating.

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"Internet's Own Boy" explores hacker Aaron Swartz's life, death

Susan King, Los Angeles Times:

On Jan. 12, 2013, [Aaron] Swartz, a developer of Reddit who had become an Internet folk hero with his commitment to make online content free to the public, hanged himself in his Brooklyn apartment. He was 26.

Swartz had been embroiled in a two-year legal battle with the federal government, which had brought multiple felony charges against him for allegedly hacking into computer systems.

Just a year after his death, writer Brian Knappenberger (“We Are Legion: The Story of the Hacktivists”) premiered his documentary, “The Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz,” at the Sundance Film Festival, where it was nominated for a Grand Jury Prize. The film opens Friday in theaters and is available on video-on-demand and iTunes.

I had somehow never heard of this film until right now and I feel really, really bad about it.

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You know what never gets old? This clip of Neil deGrasse Tyson telling the story of how he tussled with director James Cameron over an incorrect view of the night sky in the film Titanic.

Stephen Colbert hosted this interview with Tyson at Montclair Kimberley Academy in 2010.

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Ben Solovey introducing a documentary video produced for the Manos in HD project:

It wasn’t until the day I interviewed Jackey Neyman Jones and Tom Neyman in Oregon that I flipped over one of the few surviving set photographs and saw the name “Anselm Spring” stamped on the back. Despite the number of names (both real and fake) used to pad out the credits, his does not appear on the film. Just who was this person, and how’d he end up being the unknown set photographer on Manos: The Hands of Fate?

This guy is great.

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Steven Spielberg to Produce 'Halo' TV Series

Kory Grow, Rolling Stone:

Steven Spielberg will begin producing a live-action television series based on the military-themed sci-fi video game Halo in the fall of 2015, which coincides with the release of the sequel Halo 5: Guardians. The show, which will live on the Xbox Live network, will build on the success of the digital series Halo 4: Forward Unto Dawn, which debuted alongside the game Halo 4.

A WHAT, BY WHO

Microsoft previously announced that Alien director Ridley Scott was working on a multi-part Halo film, according to the Associated Press.

A WHAT, BY WHO

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Short compilation by kogonada showing Wes Anderson’s penchant for centered subjects and otherwise symmetrical shots in his films.

I really need to see The Grand Budapest Hotel at some point.

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George Gene Gustines on The New York Times's ArtsBeat blog:

In putting together “Stripped,” a documentary exploring the art and evolution of newspaper comic strips, Dave Kellett and Fred Schroeder, the co-directors, interviewed more than 70 cartoonists. One of the biggest gets was Bill Watterson, the reclusive creator of “Calvin and Hobbes,” the beloved newspaper strip about a mischievous boy and his stuffed tiger, which ran from 1985 to 1995.

Watterson even drew them some poster art, which is pretty neato.

George Gene Gustines on The New York Times's ArtsBeat blog:

In putting together “Stripped,” a documentary exploring the art and evolution of newspaper comic strips, Dave Kellett and Fred Schroeder, the co-directors, interviewed more than 70 cartoonists. One of the biggest gets was Bill Watterson, the reclusive creator of “Calvin and Hobbes,” the beloved newspaper strip about a mischievous boy and his stuffed tiger, which ran from 1985 to 1995.

Watterson even drew them some poster art, which is pretty neato.

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(Video content warning: blood and violence)

One of Colin’s and my favorite films of 2012 was The Raid: Redemption. Somehow I failed to notice that a trailer for the sequel, The Raid 2: Berandal, has been around since last year. Looks like it’s going to be intense.

I love the way this trailer is structured, by the way. Builds up to something fierce, yet doesn’t really give away any part of the plot.

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📣 ATTENTION EVERYONE ANIMATION BACKGROUNDS IS BACK 📣
For those who have never heard of it, Animation Backgrounds was a blog run by Rob Richards, who spliced together the background art from old cartoons (especially Disney and Warner Bros. stuff). In September 2010, he went on hiatus to deal with some major personal issues, and after more than three years it seemed like it would be permanent. But last month he posted asking if anyone would be interested in him continuing, and a month later he’s returned!
His first new post features art from the Disney film Peter Pan. He’s got five pieces of art, including the one I’ve attached to this post, and if you haven’t clicked the link in the last sentence you should hurry up and so do already.
Richards sounds like his life’s in a lot better place than it was a few years ago, so that’s also excellent news.

📣 ATTENTION EVERYONE ANIMATION BACKGROUNDS IS BACK 📣

For those who have never heard of it, Animation Backgrounds was a blog run by Rob Richards, who spliced together the background art from old cartoons (especially Disney and Warner Bros. stuff). In September 2010, he went on hiatus to deal with some major personal issues, and after more than three years it seemed like it would be permanent. But last month he posted asking if anyone would be interested in him continuing, and a month later he’s returned!

His first new post features art from the Disney film Peter Pan. He’s got five pieces of art, including the one I’ve attached to this post, and if you haven’t clicked the link in the last sentence you should hurry up and so do already.

Richards sounds like his life’s in a lot better place than it was a few years ago, so that’s also excellent news.

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The A.V. Club: Tamra Davis interview

2010 A.V. Club interview with director Tamra Davis, where she provides yet another excellent reason to hate the film Billy Madison:

AVC: Do you have a memorable Adam Sandler story?

TD: I don’t know. I just saw Adam recently. When we did Billy Madison, we were in Canada and staying in the same hotel. We had to bond immediately to make that film. We would spend hours talking on the phone about what we were going to do the next day. The day we were going to do the dodgeball scene, I had it all worked out with stunts and balls and kids, etcetera. The night before, Adam calls me on the phone and says, “Tamra, you know, tomorrow we’re going to do this dodgeball scene. I really want to hit these kids.” I’m like, “Adam, you can’t just hit these kids. They’re children.” He said, “No, no, no. Line them up, and ask who would be okay getting hit. Make sure you get the parents to say yes, and I’m really going to hit them hard.” I was like, “You’re crazy.” And he’s like, “No, hurting kids is funny. It’s going to be really funny.” I was like, “Adam!” And that’s what he did—he really hit those kids as hard as he could. And I cut right before you see the kids just fully start crying.

Okay, look, I get it. It’s funny because children are terrible, said the guy on the internet.

But if your immediate reaction to this wasn’t revulsion but rather “haha they took kids who were excited to be in a movie, threw things at them until they cried, and then filmed them,” then you should probably re-evaluate your life up to this point.

And if, like some of the commenters, your reaction was that it would be even funnier if they included the children crying, then you’re probably not even a real human being, just a Cylon in a skin suit.